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#16 KK

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Posted 04 April 2005 - 10:34 PM


Interesting topic and great info. Thanks PB, Karin, and Lisa.
Hi PB and welcome aboard! biggrin.gif
KK biggrin.gif


#17 Aussie Girl

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Posted 04 April 2005 - 11:09 PM

Lisa, there was a video that the Estee Lauder people made which showed the step-by-step making of the solids - it was very interesting & informative and I saw it here in Melbourne when they had a showing of all the new solids a few years ago. I guess it was made as a marketing tool but I was lucky enough to be given it when they had finished with it. If I could find it I might be a little better informed - but perhaps you have also seen it.

Karen

#18 peanutbutter

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 01:58 AM

Hi everyone,

I did not get as much time with my father as I would have liked regarding looking at my solids and letting me know how they were made... but this is what I got.

In general they look to be a nickel cast with some gold plated. The solids are very well made and the molds for these are very complex (mostly on the items that have a lot of detail and more than one finish) The solid is hung out to dry and sometimes you can see the hanger marks (Dad did not have his glasses to find the marks for me).

Vegas sign - the flow white acrylic background flow acrylic red and blude sign pole were probably injected by hand and the mold made in two pieces. With this mold the way the back was made (the pole being the brace for the sign) it would have been hard to color the back but they could have molded letters into in. Again it is really thin because the back is where the solid is held. The solution would have been to put the perfume in the base and finish the sign on both sides (as many of you had stated) But with the design they picked it was not possible.

The showgirl is made in three pieces- The body of the girl, the top half of the chips and the bottom half with the solid. This is eletrolplated in the gold the girl is mounted on the chips possilby by soder (hope I spelled this right) my spell check is not worknig and my kids are running all over right now!!

On to the slot machine - This was the most complex piece in my collection - (my collection is pretty limited right now) this appears to be a mold of dye cast nickel plated with the gold injected or melted into the mold first for the money , the arm is plastic and electroplated or covered in nickel. with the blue ball being added later. It appears the plastic sides of the slot machine are turning brown becasue of the fumes put off from the perfume.

- Some types of plastics can change color or texture due to fumes. I asked why then the fruits had not changed as they appear to be plastic ( I do not have this in my collection) He said they may have used a different type of plastic. The moving wheel on the front had to be hand applied and inserted with a pin, also plated in the gold and then the numbers, stars and lemons hand injected along with the tiny crystals applied.

Strongwater bird - this mold was probably nickel plated with electroplating over the top with a gold - and hand injected leaves and flowers.

All in all he said a lot of work went into these little molds - It is one thing to design them and another to actually mold them out of metal - every nook of the mold must be smooth and every detail must be finished before they can even pour them - The molds with a lot of detail are very very time consuming and he does not think a machine could just pop these out, some of them have to be hand polished.

My father feels any of the solids that have moving parts should be worth more down the road because so much more work went into them. Again that is his thought as he is looking at it from the making of the mold.

Lisa, I realize this did not really answer your questions as to what % is gold and got off the path a little but I thought it was interesting anyway.

My father is not an expert on Estee Lauder or solids of any type- He has worked with molds for over 40 years within the medical and aerospace industry.


#19 pinkmoiree

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 03:00 AM

Peanutbutter - it's not my business to comment this but I would like to thank you very much for the great insight you gave me smile.gif

Madeleine

#20 Martha C

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 04:58 AM

Peanutbutter, thank you (and your father, too!) for that fascinating and informative post. It gives me a new appreciation for our solids. It's interesting what your father said about the design of the sign. It looks as though Lisa's idea about putting the perfume in the base was right after all. Anyway, thanks again for a very enjoyable read. smile.gif

#21 Petals

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 06:45 AM

Peanutbutter, this is really so interesting and I would like to thank you and your Father for the time and effort taken.

My first reaction on reading the comment about the Slot Machine and why the plastic is turning in colour would be to take the perfume out of its container to avoid this!

Secondly, the comment about the moveable parts is also very interesting. That means the Roulette Wheel is also a more complex solid. Am trying to think what other solids I have which come under this heading.

Once again, many, many thanks. The information is amazing and makes really informative reading!



smile.gif


#22 Lisa

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 10:13 AM

Peanutbutter,

WOW! Very impressive reading indeed. A big thank you to you and your father for the wonderful insight on our solids. It all sounds 100% dead on.

I am fascinated by all aspects of our solids and and love hearing such details- if EL won't tell us then we just find out on our own. tongue.gif

Thanks again!


#23 Queenie

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 10:29 AM

Yes, Peanutbutter, That was very interesting reading, although I knew there was alot of complex work in the details; as I have also worked in the aerospace industry before working for my husband. I took some classes at a local community college for Mechanical Engineering and we did a class on sand castings. We did an item like a C-clamp, but nothing as intricate as the perfume solids, it is still a time consuming process as you stated. So, I believe we will all cherish our perfume solids a little more, whether they have moving parts or not. smile.gif

#24 Lisa

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 10:54 AM

Here's a tip:

To search by solids with moving parts go to the solids database put keywords in the pull down tab and type in movable you will then see all the solids that move

I may have missed some so let me know. You can also search detachable

#25 peanutbutter

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 12:40 PM

Know it was really long to read but I did the best I could to keep it short, glad you all liked the information.

Mary

#26 Ar

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 12:43 PM

This is great information and may explain why there are solids that aren't identical. For example, when I bought a Tulip bouquet at Saks, I looked at half a dozen and they were all different - i.e. different nuances of color and slightly different leaves. Maybe there's more custom hand work in these than we thought.
Ar

#27 2cute4u2

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 01:23 PM

Peanutbutter---that was a terrific explanation that you gave about how much work goes into the solids--both the mold and then the finishes.

I already appreciate the solids in my collection and your insight (and that of your father) have validated my love and admiration of the solids that I have chosen for my collection. I would love to get your father's opinion on the carrousel. wink.gif


#28 peanutbutter

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 01:31 PM

2cute4U2,

I am sure he would be happy to look at it --- of course I would have to have the carrousel at my house.... What do you think! It may just get lost in my vast solids collection.... HA HA HA.

#29 Queenie

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 02:33 PM

Thanks Lisa for the tip on the solid database and how to use it to find solids which have movable parts. I was wondering why the solid database says favorites but I can never create a favorites base from it for my own personal needs.
Why is that, Lisa?
rolleyes.gif

#30 VEGAS LADY

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 03:55 PM

PEANUTBUTTER,

A BIG THANK YOU TO YOURSELF AND YOUR FATHER FOR THE INFORMATION ON HOW OUR SOLIDS ARE MADE, IT MADE INTERESTING READING.

REGARDS......MARGARET...... smile.gif




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